This typical shoe-field loft located in SoHo, New York was lately redesigned by Caterina and Bob of TRA Studio Architecture.

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 1

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 2

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 3

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West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 7

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 8

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 9

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 10

West Broadway Loft by TRA Studio Architecture 11

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Description by TRA Studio Architecture Caterina, an architect from Venice, and Bob, an “environmental” designer and artist, moved twenty years in the past in a in SoHo typical “shoe-field” loft, the place their studio occupied the entrance half of the area; following the arrival of their son, they just lately reworked the semi-uncooked open area with few home windows, doorways and no storage right into a grown-up luminous residence with flowing widespread dwelling areas. The design takes full benefit of the historic vestiges such because the uncovered and stained ceiling beams, the brick partitions, (a demising wall nonetheless exhibits traces of the unique warehouse painted promoting),and the discovered 70’s rigorously restored toilet, completely clad in “discovered” Enzo Mari’s tiles, (in truth, once they demolished the area inside, previous to development, solely the tiled partitions remained standing). The principally inside area luckily had “good bones’ : a uncommon mild-nicely was found alongside the constructing and 5 new home windows might be added; the aluminum sleeves surrounding the m, reduce into the two’ thick masonry wall, mirror and amplify daylight, a brand new uncooked metal hearth enclosure, directly conceals and divulges the unique utilitarian brick hearth pit. The front room is furnished with 70’s Knoll credenzas and two symmetrical ten ft lengthy sofas, one being customized by Florence Knoll within the 50’s, the opposite being a uncommon Poltrona Frau leather-based unit designed within the eighty’s by Massimo Vignelli. The kitchen , a basic Bulthaup, is surrounded by Thonet stools. During their frequent travels to their home in Venice they assembled a set of essential mid-century Murano glass items ,principally from A.S.D.M. The show rotates on the cabinets of their eating room, totally constructed-out of the beams they salvaged after the demolition of the constructing that stood earlier than at forty four Mercer, the place now a brand new constructing, additionally designed by TRA, now stands, (they’re now beginning a line of furnishings using the beams they collected from the totally different loft buildings they renovated). It is no surprise that they instinctively gravitated in the direction of accumulating the venetian glass since, the continual reinvention of pragmatic, utilitarian objects, finds considerably a parallel of their design philosophy, additionally it’s a materials that needs to be labored with quick, equally to Bob Traboscia’s “minimal pour” items. The remix of up to date, modernist and customized furnishings, venetian objects collections, (Murano glass, Fortuny materials, classic di Camerino equipment) and the exhibited artwork, are an instance of TRA’s “curated interiors”, the place the choice could be very a lot about what’s there as about what isn’t, in a modifying course of just like the one in every of an artist that juxtaposes discovered objects. The snug aura, the luminous, enthusiastic, layered area, the knowledge of the facility of colour and the “lightness of order” are typical of each of TRA’s interiors and of Robert Traboscia’s work, that are routinely exhibited as in a real artist’s loft, turning the artwork into the “view” of the inside areas. Of course, our loft is a piece in progress, keep tuned! Visit TRA Studio Architecture

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